Lucie Manette: Character Analysis || A Tale of Two Cities

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      The heroines of Charles Dickens have a special place in the writing of fiction by him. They are quite natural in regard to the plot construction of Dickens novels the female personalities of Charles Dickens always appear lively and energetic, at the same time they represent common tender aspect of female charm. Lucie Manette daughter of Dr Alexander Manette the heroine of the novel A Tale of Two Cities is symbolised as the ideal womanhood, responsible for all the good things attracted around her life. Dr. Manette, Sidney, Charles and Lory are all resurrected in some way or the other because of Lucie's innate natural goodness and compassion. Lucie the only daughter of Dr. Manette attracts everyone by her physical and mental charm her care and compassion makes her a pillar of strength for her father. She provides him mental physical and moral support.

Lucie Manette daughter of Dr Alexander Manette the heroine of the novel is symbolised as the ideal womanhood, responsible for all the good things attracted around her life.
Lucie Manette

      In fact she infuses love in all those who come in contact with her life. The way she falls in love with Charles, she equally sympathise and feels compression for Sydney Carton. Thus we see that Lucie Manette appears pretty, lovable, good and noble, inspiring Pure Love in her father lorry, Stryver, Sidney, Charles and every miss pros. Her virtues and qualities are estimated highly by everyone as she brings happiness to the lives of others.

      All the time we see Lucie displaying observation and current judgement of characters. She realise madam Dafarge's hatred and Sidney's goodness. She does not judge a man by his words but looks deep within. Lucie listens to Sydney, sees his wounds teachers him to see the good thing in life, inspiring him all the time. Thus Lucie Manette becomes a support, a mental shelter to all who come in her life. Her nobility and goodness have always custard a nameless charm to all who knows her closely. Thus Charles Dickens scratches this lady in a most unique way and marvelously, her portrayal appears truly appropriate in accordance with the historical setting of the novel.

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