Philosophy: of William Blake Illustrate in his Poetry

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Theory of Contrariety:

      Blake's Philosophy asserts, more than anything else, the contrariety of systems with regard to human soul and the other objects of creation. Blake is a devout admirer of intrinsic energies and sublime instincts of human soul. For him, this energetic aspect of human soul - which other thinkers took as vicious - was unavoidable for human salvation. Precisely, that is why he asserts: "Without contraries is no progression." For him, again, 'good' is the passive that obeys reason whereas 'evil is the active stemming out from energy. So, Blake vehemently defies any sort of repression upon the impulses of man and frankly supports its liberty and freedom.

Blake's philosophy on Universe and its complex set up is all grounded on the theory of imagination. For Blake, any logical analysis of nature of Universe thoroughly based upon science and reason is grievously misleading. Only the world of imagination can bring about a world of order and beauty in which all perspectives of universe and the entire faculties of human soul fall into their own proper and fit order.
William Blake

Philosophy Based on Imagination:

      Blake's philosophy on Universe and its complex set up is all grounded on the theory of imagination. For Blake, any logical analysis of nature of Universe thoroughly based upon science and reason is grievously misleading. Only the world of imagination can bring about a world of order and beauty in which all perspectives of universe and the entire faculties of human soul fall into their own proper and fit order.

Theory of Time:

      On the problem of eternity and time, Blake says that time and eternity meet in our living bodies, where the selfhood and manhood strive together, the impersonal and eternal with the subjective and temporal, and this strife is our humanity. In brief, it is man's imagination which is eternal and everlasting.

      (i) Blake on God: William Blake denounces any religion that tightens its reign on the free flow of human instincts and natural impulses. And for him the gods invented by such a religion is a 'Nobodaddy' that is, nobody's father. On the other hand, Blake holds the idea of a loving God. Blake sees God not as an abstraction in the void, or at heaven, dwelling apart from man. He is within us: it is the sum total of all the divine qualities which we call God.

      (ii) Imagination versus God: For Blake 'Imagination' is that faculty in man which can hear the promptings of God. intuition or Spiritual Sensation. Thus he speaks of Christ as Divine Imagination' which is also represented by Los.

      (iii) The Message of the Bard: The Bard comes to bring to mankind more abundant life, to rid them of the oppressive elements of Urizen and convince them that man's physical energies and cravings are not shameful or to be concealed; instead, they are the driving forces of life. "Energy" which is Eternal Delight" is symbolised by "fiery Orc" and 'Tiger'; so, expression is good and suppression is evil and sinful. In this sense Blake's Christianity was heretical. for it identified Christ the Son with all spiritual goodness and made God the Father a symbol of terror and tyranny.

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