Gitanjali Poem no. 96 || Summary and Analysis

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When I go from hence let this be my parting word, that what I have seen is unsurpassable.

I have tasted of the hidden honey of this lotus that expands on the ocean of light, and thus am I blessed - let this be my parting word.

In this playhouse of infinite forms I have had my play and here have I caught sight of him that is formless.

My whole body and my limbs have thrilled with his touch who is beyond touch; and if the end comes here, let it come - let this be my parting word.

When I go from hence let this be my parting word, that what I have seen is unsurpassable.
Gitanjali Poem no. 96

Summary

      The lyric expresses the last words of Tagore when he will leave this world. The poet is full of gratitude and satisfaction. He has drunk deep the cup of life. For him the gifts of life are 'insurpassable'. They are match less and cannot be excelled. He has enjoyed the hidden honey of this life lotus which is a vast and all pervasive as an ocean. He has experienced the bliss of divine love in this life and this is his parting message to the world. For Tagore life or the world is a playhouse and man plays with endless forms of this play house. Like Shakespeare he believes that this earth is a stage, this creation is Lila of God. One can experience this Lila through: having vibrant body, un-prejudice mind and heart full of love. Shakespeare says the man acts his part and vanishes but Tagore's philosophy says that even God here acts many parts and assumes many forms. His play is infinite and eternal while that of man is momentary. In the glory of this universe he has seen His formless reflection. His touch has given him pleasure and filled him with the thrill. He is completely satisfied with his life and if the end comes to him he welcomes it after such satisfaction.

Critical Analysis

      The feeling of satisfaction is in the air of the lyric. The mood is of joy and gratitude. The man, the poet is full of praise and gratefulness towards the life. He has enjoyed the sweet honey of this cup of life and after being played with myraid forms he want to part away with it with the words of gratitude for his life and Divine spirit to complete his act of enjoying the cup of death.

"My whole body and my limbs have thrilled with his touch who is beyond touch; and if the end comes here, let it come - let this be my parting word."

      This is the parting speech of the poet. Here the difference is that instead of death the life on the earth is glorified. When death strikes, all that man has ignored or spurned earlier looks more valuable and appears beautiful. The poet is drowned in the beauty and fascination of the creation of God.

      The poet has looked upon the world as a playhouse full of infinite forms, these forms reflect the formless, i.e. they incarnate some aspect of God who Himself is formless. His body has been thrilled by the touch of the objects of Nature - although they themselves are a manifestation of God who is beyond touch. He would be happy if his end comes in such surroundings - he would like it to be his parting words that he is glad to die in the midst of the myriad form of life which derive their vitality from God.

Annotations

      Unsurpassable: matchless. Infinite: innumerable. Thrilled: felt a pleasurable sensation.

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