Sand Dunes : by Robert Frost || Summary and Analysis

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Sand Dunes

Sea waves are green and wet,
But up from where they die,
Rise others vaster yet,
And those are brown and dry.

They are the sea made land
To come at the fisher town,
And bury in solid sand
The men she could not drown.

She may know cove and cape,
But she does not know mankind
If by any change of shape,
She hopes to cut off mind.

Men left her a ship to sink:
They can leave her a hut as well;
And be but more free to think
For the one more cast-off shell.

Sea waves are green and wet, But up from where they die, Rise others vaster yet, And those are brown and dry.
Sand Dunes

Analysis

Introduction:

      The short poem Sand Dunes by Robert Frost from West-Running Brook effectively presents a profound idea on the greatness of man's mind. All these coastal occurrences bring enormous notion in human mind which fetch nobility of ethnic concern.

Summary:

      The poem expresses the implicit danger of sand dunes. There are vaster waves than green and wet waves of the sea-namely, "vaster waves" of sand, "brown and dry", that rise on the coast. The sea may drown men, but these sand dunes can bury men under its solid layers of loose sand. However, man's mind can rise above the perils of sea or sand, for it is capable of free and unlimited thought.

Critical Remarks:

      This poem, written in quatrains, is a blend of description and meditation. Illustration of dormant hazard inside the sand dunes, which has great implication on once upliftment toward psychic mind.

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