Fragmentary Blue : by Robert Frost || Summary and Analysis

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Fragmentary Blue

Why make so much of fragmentary blue
In here and there a bird, or butterfly,
Or flower, or wearing-stone, or open eye,
When heaven presents in sheets the solid hue?

Since earth is earth, perhaps, not heaven (as yet)--
Though some savants make earth include the sky;
And blue so far above us comes so high,
It only gives our wish for blue a whet.

Why make so much of fragmentary blue In here and there a bird, or butterfly, Or flower, or wearing-stone, or open eye, When heaven presents in sheets the solid hue?
Fragmentary Blue

Summary and Analysis

Introduction:

      Fragmentary Blue by Robert Frost, a short poem of eight lines from New Hampshire is about our love of blue colour. It is one of those Frost poems which express a passing thought, observation or reflection, without being very profound. Fascination regard the colour blue is the orientation of this small poem. The colour blue, has its adorable concern toward every element.

Summary:

      The poet wonders why people make so much of the fragments of blue found on the wings of a butterfly, in a flower, a sapphire, or in human eyes, when the whole of the blue sky is there to satisfy our craving for the colour. The fascination regarding the colour of blue echoes the narration. However, feels the poet, it may be because we live on the earth and heaven or sky is too far above to satisfy our desire for the colour. The earth is not as yet heaven, says the poet, meaning that the day of universal happiness visualized by people has not yet come. Here the colour of blue assimilate with heavenly embodiment in the sphere of earth.

Critical Remarks:

      This poem, one cannot say, ends in 'wisdom' The subject is just a passing thought but the poem is fanciful and delightful. It is written in a compact style. This is the specimen of how momentary thought can be illustrate in a delightful manner.

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