To Earthward : by Robert Frost || Summary and Analysis

Also Read

To Earthward

Love at the lips was touch
As sweet as I could bear;
And once that seemed too much;
I lived on air

That crossed me from sweet things,
The flow of - was it musk
From hidden grapevine springs
Down hill at dusk?

I had the swirl and ache
From sprays of honeysuckle
That when they're gathered shake
Dew on the knuckle.

I craved strong sweets, but those
Seemed strong when I was young;
The petal of the rose
It was that stung.

Now no joy but lacks salt
That is not dashed with pain
And weariness and fault;
I crave the stain

Of tears, the aftermark
Of almost too much love,
The sweet of bitter bark
And burning clove.

When stiff and sore and scarred
I take away my hand
From leaning on it hard
In grass and sand,

The hurt is not enough:
I long for weight and strength
To feel the earth as rough
To all my length.

Love at the lips was touch As sweet as I could bear; And once that seemed too much; I lived on air  That crossed me from sweet things, The flow of - was it musk From hidden grapevine springs Down hill at dusk?
To Earthward

Analysis

Introduction:

      The poem To Earthward by Robert Frost dealing with the bitterness and sting of love is from New Hampshire. Loving concern toward beloved loses its strength and reach at its braking point for the mulishness in between lovers. Enduring quality of love is lacking on the perspective of love.

Summary:

      When the poet was young the rose petal stung. Now every joy is "dashed with pain and weariness and fault". He hungers for "the after mark of almost too much love". Once the poet had found the sweetness of "love at the lips" too much. He had been greeted by "musk from hidden grapevine springs" at dusk. But youth had passed, and now he yearns in vain for "the sweet of bitter bark and burning clove" He wants to feel the earth's roughness against the whole of his body. The poet's meaning is not very clear. We can only say that the poem is a lament over the loss resulting from the passage of youth.

Critical Appreciation:

      This rather unconventional love poem once again shows Frost's ability to transfigure the smallest of things. There is a mood of intense despondency in the poem, and the poet is inconsolable as he hungers in vain for a feeling of ecstatic kinship with the world. The narrator illustrate very mild incident between lovers in a significant manner with its bitter dormant intensity.

Previous Post Next Post

Google Search