The Telephone : by Robert Frost || Analysis

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The Telephone

'When I was just as far as I could walk
From here today,
There was an hour
All  still
When leaning with my head again a flower
I heard you talk.
Don't say I, didn't for I heard you say-
You spoke from that flower on the window sill-
Do you remember what it was you said?'
'First tell me what it was you thought you
heard.'
'Having found the flower and driven a bee away,
I leaned on my head
And holding by the stalk,
I listened and I thought I caught the word- What was it? Did you call me by my name?
Or did you say- 
Someone said "Come" - I heard it as I bowed.' 
'I may have thought as much, but not aloud.' 'Well, so I came.'

The Telephone 'When I was just as far as I could walk From here today, There was an hour All  still When leaning with my head again a flower I heard you talk.
The Telephone

Introduction:

      The Telephone, by Robert Frost a love poem in the form of a dialogue, is from Mountain Interval. The term "telephone" signifies the telepathic communication between lovers, and not the actual instrument.

Development of Thought:

      The lover had been walking about. He leant his head against a flower which appeared to transmit a message from his beloved. She appeared to speak through another flower growing on her window sill. On being asked by the beloved what he heard, the lover replies that she had called him. She remarks that she might have thought it, but had not said it aloud. He says that he understood her thought and hence came to meet her.

Critical Comments:

      In this charming poem, love has been given an original treatment. The visit of a lover to his beloved is explained in a unique manner. Loving concern toward telepathic reach for a lover, illustrate throughout the entire poem. Which being the love poem to its highest reach of order.

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