The Sound Of Trees : by Robert Frost || Analysis

Also Read

The Sound Of Trees

I wonder about the trees.
Why do we wish to bear
Forever the noise of these
More than another noise
So close to our dwelling place?
We suffer them by the day
Till we lose all measure of pace,
And fixity in our joys,
And acquire a listening air.
They are that that talks of going
But never gets away;
And that talks no less for knowing,
As it grows wiser and older,
That now it means to stay.
My feet tug at the floor
And my head sways to my shoulder
Sometimes when I watch trees sway,
From the window or the door.
I shall set forth for somewhere,
I shall make the reckless choice
Some day when they are in voice
And tossing so as to scare
The white clouds over them on.
I shall have less to say,
But I shall be gone.

I wonder about the trees. Why do we wish to bear Forever the noise of these More than another noise So close to our dwelling place? We suffer them by the day Till we lose all measure of pace, And fixity in our joys, And acquire a listening air.
The Sound Of Trees

Introduction:

      The Sound Of Trees by Robert Frost is included in Mountain Interval, according to some critics, this poem has the same uncertainty as The Road Not Taken. However, the poem is quite complex. The deep concern toward the rhythm of sound become a reminder of very present situation of narrator.

Development of Thought:

      The poet asks why we wish to endure the sound of trees. We acquire a static attitude towards the sound, losing the sense of comprehension of the rhythm of movement and stability. The sound of trees is like the man who talks of making a move but does not do so. The poet is reminded of his own situation. However, he will "make the reckless choice" some day. The poet mingling himself with the rhythm of sound to enhance his receptive quality to get the essence of life. Base of the creation is sound. So the narrator allow, sound to flow throughout himself to get the abstract of creation.

Critical Remarks:

      Mankind should become dynamic. Formative decisions are not matters of clearcut choices, but are much more complex - this is what Frost seems to imply. But Yvor Winters feels that the poem shows the "whimsical, accidental, and incomprehensible nature of the formative decision." The poem deals with a desire to depart "which has never quite been realised". Frost mistakes "whimsical impulse for moral choice" says Winters. He seems to be vaguely fearful of being neither right nor wrong.

Previous Post Next Post

Google Search