Ismat Chugtai: Writer in Indian English literature

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       Ismat Chugtai, the other prominent writer attracts our attention with her novel 'The Hearts Breaks Free', brings the story of oppressed people like Bua. Here, Chugtai shows the youthful, vital, non-chalant and exuberant Bua is in trouble, physicaly and in spirit, when she submits to the so-called reforming control of the traditional family. In contrast, rebellious Qudsia and Shabir, by isolating themselves from the traditional community, are able to find a new, fulfilling life. Chugtai has vision of feminist utopia, which preserves the identity and happiness of the oppressed subjects. It is not conspicuously transformative as far as the patriarchal structure is concerned. What Shabir and Qudsia are able to achieve is a blissful separatist retreat from the world, an individualistic and subjective feminist utopia that does not offer any synthesis of sociality and individuality within the normative community.


Chugtai has vision of feminist utopia, which preserves the identity and happiness of the oppressed subjects.
Ismat Chugtai

      Chugatai's novel openly reveals and reinforces the revolutionary and reconstructive features of their utopian community to the society. So that it can see how the outsiders' community function as a family in an extended sense, but it is different from the traditional Indian family where the men's and elders authority quickly takes over, and women are forced to earn merit by sacrifice. Some critics have raised concerns regarding the viability of such feminist utopias. In her article, 'The Ideal community and the politics of Difference', Iris Young argues utopian societies by negating the existing social structures negate the concept of social change or evolution and thereby become static, functioning outside time or history.

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